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Saturday, 22 November 2014

Facebook's Expatriates in Peru

A couple of years ago I wrote about forums about Peru. It seems that there's been a move away from forums in general as people are becoming more and more addicted to Facebook. The group, Expatriates in Peru has over 2,000 members and lots of info about Peru and learning Spanish.  If you don't know Spanish, you should start learning. It'll help you assimilate to the culture, and you'll be able to communicate easier. If you're looking to learn Spanish, check out Synergy Spanish, Rosetta Stone, and Fluent in 3 Months.

There are some problems with Facebook groups: they're not that searchable, information is quickly lost on the wall, and you can't see all of one person's posts, just to name a few. I honestly am trying to step away from both Facebook and forums since it's just too overwhelming. It's too easy to be connected to a computer or smartphone all day and I don't think it's worth it at all. However, those issues don't stop people from using Facebook. Hopefully in the future Facebook groups will get better.


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Wednesday, 12 November 2014

Tips for Taking Taxis in Peru

A Peruvian moto (epidemicfun.com)
Like combis, taxis, or ticos as they're somethings called, in Peru are often gutted and look like they're on their last legs. Metal's often missing and most of the components from the dashboard will probably have been taken out. Nontheless many people use them to get around and they can be a faster option than combis. If you're looking for an even cheaper option, consider motos. If you're going to take taxis there are a couple of things you should consider.

1. Call ahead of time. If you're worried about safety then call for a taxi. There are a handful of taxi companies out there, or find a taxi driver that you trust and can call when you need them.

2. Agree on the fare. Many taxis don't have meters. And if they do, they probably won't use it. Be sure to agree on the fare before you even get into the taxi. I actually prefer not using the meter as it's less likely that the driver will take you on the scenic route.
3. Text someone the license plate. You just never know, it's better to be safe than sorry. 

4. Speak Spanish. If you don't want to get the foreigner price you're going to have to speak Spanish. Learning a bit of the local language will help you out so much no matter where you go. It'll help you assimilate to the culture and you'll be able to communicate easier. If you're looking to learn Spanish, check out Synergy Spanish, Rosetta Stone, and Fluent in 3 Months.

The Ultimate Peru List recommends:

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